Creme Brulee: Feast of Sweet and Comforting Aromas

A delicious aroma that transports you to faraway kitchens. A unique gourmand for the sweet-toothed. 

How It Smells

This candle exudes a delightful patisserie sweetness. What starts as a thick and creamy caramel aroma develops complexity, bringing in notes of vanilla and hints of chocolate.

Scent Origins

Behind the opulent guest rooms and magnificent halls, below the gilded walkways and grassy terraces, Francois Massialot is hard at work. Men and women of 17th-century French aristocracy flit between the hall above as Francois works in the kitchen below.

The setting is the Palace of Versailles. Louis IX, the ‘sun king’ has recently made the Palace the royal residence and created an estate fit for a god, let alone a king. What do you cook for those who’ve tasted everything? The ordinary was out of the question. 

Massialot would experiment for many years in the palace, developing unique recipes like the meringue, Marcreuse en ragoût au chocolate, and of course… Crème Brûlée.

A rich and dense custard base topped with a brittle layer of glass-like caramelized sugar. The combination of two opposite textures for maximum effect. A taste of bourgeois France at its zenith.

Benefits

This candle is the ultimate escape at the end of a long day. It can be used to transport oneself to a land of indulgence, of kings, queens, and incredible expense. The warm glow of the flame casts a calming ambiance over spaces, while the aromas relax and enchant to satisfaction.

If You Go

The Palace of Versailles is somewhere everybody should see at least once in their life. It’s an awe-inspiring architectural marvel that has no peer. There are no better examples of the all-encompassing wealth and power of the absolute monarchies of the past. 

2,300 rooms spread over 63,154 m2 encompass the seat of power of the ancien regime. The palace itself is just one part. There are gardens, a cathedral, and an unmissable Hall of Mirrors to visit, to name but a few.

Tickets come in the form of various ‘passports’ that grant you access to the grounds. The cheapest passport gives you 1 day of access to the palace with an audio guide, access to the estate of Trianon, to the temporary exhibitions, the musical fountain shows, and the coach gallery – for €20 or more. 

Getting here is straightforward, too. Located just outside of Paris, public transport can get you there cheaply and easily (if a little slowly). It should take between 1 and 1.5 hours to get here and cost €7.10 for a round trip. Click here for more information on getting here.

Remember, Paris is one of the most visited cities in the world. Even outside of the city, in Versailles, crowds can become a problem. If you want to avoid queues and being poked in the eye with selfie sticks, it is wise to visit outside of the peak summer months.

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France Editions: Explore Culinary Traditions

Creme Brulee | Sparkling Champagne | Dark Chocolate |  France Gift Set